Vinyl Flooring

How to Remove Vinyl Floors?
If you want to remove vinyl flooring, you have come to the proper location. In this blog post, we’ll show you how to do exactly that. We’ll go over everything from removing luxury vinyl to gluing down vinyl flooring and removing sticky adhesive residue from plywood and concrete subfloors. So, whether you want to replace your vinyl flooring or save money and time by doing your own home renovations, we’ve got you covered.
Steps To Take Before Removing Vinyl Flooring
1. Gather your tools.
The first step in removing vinyl flooring is to ensure that you have the proper tools. You’ll need specific supplies based on the sort of vinyl flooring you have. For a floating floor (one that is not glued down), a claw hammer, trim puller, pliers, and utility knife should suffice. If your flooring is held down with adhesive or glue, you will need a heat gun, floor scraping equipment, and possibly vinyl flooring adhesive remover.
In addition to these items, you may want to purchase a shop vacuum to properly remove any leftover debris, eye protection, work gloves, a respirator (if using chemical solutions), and thick rubbish bags. Make sure you have these supplies on hand before starting the project.
2. Clear the area.
Obviously, you don’t want sofas, mattresses, carpets, or other furniture sitting on your vinyl flooring while you’re removing it. So, before you begin, empty the room and create a clear work area.
3. Remove baseboards.
Baseboards are typically located on the flooring’s margins. So, before you start removing your vinyl flooring, you must first remove the baseboards. Here’s how to accomplish it.
Begin at the top of the baseboard, where the wall and trim meet. Using a little touch, run the utility knife down the seam to release the caulk or dried paint. It is critical to break this seal before prying the baseboard away to avoid damaging the drywall.
Examine the underside of the baseboard. Is there quarter-round molding or trim in place? If this is the case, use a trim puller and pliers to remove any nails that remain.
When the baseboard is clear of obstructions and adhesions, gently pry it loose using the trim pulling tool and remove it away from the wall. Once the majority of the baseboards have been removed, you should be able to finish the work by hand.
How to Remove Luxury Vinyl Floors
Now it’s time to start ripping up the vinyl flooring. To begin, we’ll talk about how to remove floating vinyl flooring like luxury vinyl planks, luxury vinyl tiles, WPC flooring, and SPC flooring. While some of these forms can be glued down, they are usually free-floating and supported only by the baseboards. This makes the removal process extremely straightforward!
Begin by finding a corner of the room or an edge of the wall. With the baseboards removed, just lift up on an area of vinyl flooring and, if necessary, use a claw hammer to loosen the board. However, certain boards are more securely fastened than others; so, to “unlock” the flooring, employ a raise and twist wrist motion to release the click-lock.
Continue this method throughout the entire space, piling your boards as you go. When carefully removed, the majority of your vinyl flooring should be reusable. Simply inspect the edges to ensure that no damage has occurred to the lock mechanisms, and keep the reusable boards apart from the damaged ones. Once all of the vinyl flooring has been removed, remove any underlayment and suction any remaining debris with a shop vacuum. We told you it was easy!
How to Remove Adhesive-Based Vinyl Planks and Tiles?
While click-lock vinyl flooring may be removed in less than an hour, bonded flooring takes longer. When preparing to remove glue-down vinyl, it is crucial to mind the subfloor. Is the vinyl floor bonded to concrete or laid on wood (plywood, hardwood, etc.)? If it’s the former, you can use a little more power; if it’s the latter, you’ll need to be softer to avoid injuring the timber subfloor underneath.
For adhesive-based vinyl, start in the middle of the room rather than the corner, as we did with luxury vinyl flooring. Using a floor scraper, gently press or scrape at the board’s seam to check if it can be popped out of position. The board may easily loosen or remain firmly in place (fingers crossed for the former); however, if it is resistant, you may need to use a heat gun or find a wider seam to get started.
The removal technique for peel and stick vinyl tiles is quite similar; however, because the material is so thin, it requires extra attention. For thinner vinyl flooring, you may need to use a razor knife between tiles as well as a tiny hand-held scraper to carefully peel the flooring out of its position. In addition, a heat gun will help to release any tenacious adhesive.
How to Remove Leftover Glue From Vinyl Flooring
After removing glue-down vinyl flooring, there is a good chance that adhesive residue will remain. This glue should be removed before installing your new flooring to ensure a clean working area. Here’s how to accomplish it.
Remove adhesive from plywood.
The most useful tool for removing glue from a wooden flooring is a handheld scraper. Apply modest force to the edge of your scraper as you angle it towards the base of the glue, increasing pressure as needed. Increase the force gradually so that you do not end up with a gauged piece of wooden flooring. Fortunately, glue dries to be fairly brittle, so you’ll likely lift many chunks of glue at once, making cleanup easier. You can also use a heat gun and a scraping instrument to remove old adhesive from the subflooring. If there is still adhesive on the surface, you can use a sander; however, this is a dusty process that necessitates additional cleanup and the use of a respirator to avoid breathing excess dust particles.
Removing glue from concrete.
Glue removal from concrete can be simple or difficult, depending on the type and quantity of glue employed. The silver lining is that this sort of subfloor is extremely robust and can withstand far more force than wood. As a result, if you have persistent glue stuck to your concrete flooring, feel free to use a stronger floor scraper. A heat gun and a variety of chemical treatments are other options. However, while utilizing chemicals, you should examine if your concrete floor is sealed or unsealed. When some solutions are applied to unsealed concrete, they can leave oil stains. Make sure you read the fine print and use the appropriate solution for your flooring.

Vinyl Flooring